Passport Cover Letter Sample Uk Employment

A CV (curriculum vitae) is a short list of facts about your education, work history, skills and experience. A good CV is essential when looking for work and it is worth taking the time to get it right so you can sell yourself to an employer.

Creating a new CV

Use your CV to make the most of yourself and your achievements. It is often the first contact you will have with an employer.

How you present your CV is up to you. Use the online CV builder to create, edit, download and print a CV, or follow the tips below to create a good and professional impression.

If you are accessing the CV Builder Tool on a public device, make sure you delete any personal information from the system when you have finished working on it. Check with the device provider if you’re unsure how to do it.

You may also follow the tips below to help you create a good and professional CV.

Presenting your CV

  • print your CV on good-quality, white A4 paper, in a clear font
  • put your name at the top of the page – not curriculum vitae or CV
  • include your address, telephone number and email address at the top
  • show your career history to date , including work experience and employment history
  • present the content clearly and concisely, making it easy to read and understand
  • use positive language
  • aim for no more than  two pages
  • ask someone to proofread it to check your spelling and grammar

You do not need to put your date of birth, age, or salary on your CV.

Always put your most recent job first and remember to include dates. Avoid gaps between dates. Even if you weren't in paid employment refer to voluntary work or other experiences that added to your skills set.

If you’ve had lots of different roles, you may not be able to include everything, so prioritise your most recent and relevant details. Compress earlier roles into short descriptions or just include job titles and highlight the skills and experience you gained across those jobs (such as skills in dealing with customers or communication skills).

If you don't have much work experience, then you can include details of temporary, holiday, part-time or voluntary work. .

What to include in your CV

Below are some examples of what you may want to include in your CV:

A personal profile

A personal profile is a short statement at the beginning of your CV used to sell yourself and to show your skills, experience and personal qualities. You can include positive words such as 'can', 'adaptable', and 'conscientious'. Tailor the statement to the requirements of each job that you apply for, to show the employer that you're the right person for the job.

Skills and strengths

Highlight your skills and strengths. A skill is something you gain with education and experience, a strength is something you are naturally good at. Tailor these to match the requirements of the job you are applying for.

If language skills are important for the job you are applying for, then you need to complete the Europass Language Passport and attach it to your CV.

If the job you are applying for is different from work which  you have previously done, then explain why you are interested in applying for this  new type of work.

Qualifications and training

Include qualifications you got from school or college as well as any qualifications and training from previous jobs (such as training in health and safety or a certificate in food hygiene). Put your most recent qualifications first.

Interests

Your hobbies and leisure activities can help support your application if they highlight responsibilities and skills that are relevant to the job you're applying for, such as organising activities for a  a club you belong to, or using leadership skills or teamwork as part of an activity.

References

You don’t have to include references in your CV but you should state at the end of your CV that references are available.

It's good to have two or more people who can provide a work or personal reference. Ideally, one should be your most recent employer but if you haven't worked for a while it could be someone who has known you for a long time who can comment on your work skills and qualities.

You should ask the referees to agree to this beforehand.

Using your CV

You can send your CV to a company with a covering letter or email asking if they have any current or future vacancies. You can find names and addresses of companies on the internet, in newspapers, or in trade or telephone directories.

You can use your CV to help you remember all the dates and information each time you fill in an application form, apply for a job by phone or before a job interview. You can also leave a copy with the interviewer(s) if they do not already have one.

Recruitment/employment agencies usually ask to see your CV before you register with them.

Covering letter for your CV

It is good manners and professional courtesy to enclose a covering letter with your CV, giving the job reference and repeating your contact details.

While your CV gives the facts about your employment, the covering letter might explain why you are interested in the job and why it's just right for you. You must try to give the prospective employer a reason to want to read your CV.

Keep it short and to the point, one A4 page is preferable.

If you have a contact name write ‘Dear Mr Jones’ and end with ‘Yours sincerely’. If you don’t have a contact name write ‘Dear Sir / Madam’ and end with ‘Yours faithfully’.

State what the vacancy is and how you heard about it, for example, ‘With reference to your advertisement in the Daily News on 2 May'.

List the skills you have that are relevant to the job. If the advert mentions motivation give an example to show how you’re motivated. Give real-life experiences or personal qualities which could make you stand out from other candidates.

Sign your name clearly. Check your spelling and grammar and make sure your letter is set out clearly and logically. Ask someone else to check it over for you.

Enclose your CV with the letter or attach it if sending it by email.

More useful links

by Michael Cheary

Calling all jobseekers: your cover letter needs you…

Even if you know everything about the perfect cover letter, putting one together can seem like a stressful ordeal. Not only do you have to think about the contents, you also have to consider what structure and formatting will make it stand out.

We’ve already covered what a cover letter is and how to write a cover letter, but if you’re still feeling frustrated when it comes to formatting – here’s our cover letter template to help you get started:

 

Download Free Cover Letter Template

 

Opening the letter

Once you’ve covered the letter writing basics (address, hiring manager’s name if you have it), the opening paragraph should be short and to the point.

Explain what job you’re applying for and where you found the vacancy.

Feel free to mention the website by name (e.g. ‘as advertised on reed.co.uk’) or, if someone referred you to the contact, mention their name in this section.

Example: 
Iwish to apply for the role of IT Manager, currently being advertised on reed.co.uk. Please find enclosed my CV for your consideration.

How to overcome common cover letter problems

 

Second paragraph – Why are you suitable for the job?

Briefly describe your professional and academic qualifications that are relevant to the role and ensure you refer to some of the skills listed in the job description.

If you have no specific academic or vocational qualifications to cite, use your relevant experience to win merit.

And if you’re lacking in practical work experience? Use personal skills or attributes to show what makes you the perfect fit for the role.

Example:
As you can see from my attached CV, I have over three years’ experience in the IT Industry, and I believe the knowledge and skills built up during this time make me the perfect candidate for the role.

Five things you need to stop doing on your cover letter

Third paragraph – What can you do for the company?

Use practical examples to emphasise what you can do for the company. These might be performance-based, and could include examples from previous positions, your current job or even from your academic career.

Always make sure your examples are as quantifiable and pertinent as possible. ‘Increased revenue by x%’, for instance, sounds a lot more impressive than simply stating you ‘Increased revenue’.

Other (role-specific) examples include ‘drove x% more traffic to the website during my time in employment’, ‘an increase in students grades by x’ and ‘achieved a first class distinction grade in my dissertation on x’.

Example:
In my current role as Senior Marketing Executive at Software Company X Ltd, I have been responsible for increasing incoming client enquiries for our B2B product lines by 156% in under 12 months, which helped the business increase its revenue by 55% year-on-year.

Cover letter help

Fourth paragraph – Reiterate

Here’s where you reiterate your interest in the role and why you would be the right fit for the company.

Example: 
I am confident that I can bring this level of success with me to your company and help IT Company LTD build upon their reputation as one the UK’s fastest-growing software houses. With my previous experience and expertise, I believe I can hit the ground running and start actively contributing to the business as soon as possible.

Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to meeting with you to discuss my application further.

Closing the letter

Thank the employer for their time. It is also a good opportunity to indicate that you’d like to meet with the employer for an interview.

Sign off your cover letter with ‘Yours sincerely’ (if you know the name of the hiring manager)/’Yours faithfully’ (if you do not), and your name.

Example:
Thank you for your time and consideration. I look forward to meeting with you to discuss my application further.

Yours sincerely,

[Your name]

Final thoughts

Remember: this is a template, not a ready-made cover letter.

This means that it’ll only be effective if you actually put the work in. So before you get started – take some time to research the company and role, and think about how your skills and experience make you a good fit.

Then, do this for every single job you apply for. Because although you won’t have to completely rewrite your cover letter each time, making small changes that make it tailored to the job are essential.

Finally, your cover letter will always look different depending on your situation – whether you’ve just graduated, you’re coming back from a career break, you’re looking for part-time work, or anything else.

Take a look at our cover letter help & tips for specific pointers on how to write yours.

 

Still searching for your perfect position?View all available jobs now

 

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *