Bruno Latour Bibliography Example

Book Description:

Bruno Latour stirs things up. Latour began as a lover of science and technology, co-founder of actor-network theory, and philosopher of a modernity that had "never been modern." In the meantime he is regarded not just as one of the most intelligent and also popular exponents of science studies but also as a major innovator of the social sciences, an exemplary wanderer who walks the line between the sciences and the humanities. This book provides the first comprehensive overview of the Latourian oeuvre, from his early anthropological studies in Abidjan (Ivory Coast), to influential books like Laboratory Life and Science in Action, and his most recent reflections on an empirical metaphysics of "modes of existence." In the course of this enquiry it becomes clear that the basic problem to which Latour's work responds is that of social tradition, the transmission of experience and knowledge. What this empirical philosopher constantly grapples with is the complex relationship of knowledge, time, and culture.

eISBN: 978-0-8232-6373-8

Subjects: Anthropology

Bruno Latour, (born June 22, 1947, Beaune, France), Frenchsociologist and anthropologist known for his innovative and iconoclastic work in the study of science and technology in society.

Latour’s early studies were in philosophy and theology, but his interests expanded to include anthropology and the philosophy of science and technology while he was stationed in Côte d’Ivoire for military service in the early 1970s. He received a doctorate in philosophy from the University of Tours in 1975.

Latour’s subsequent work dealt with the activities of communities of scientists. His book Laboratory Life (1979), written with Steven Woolgar, a sociologist, was the result of more than a year spent observing molecular biologists at the Salk Institute for Biological Sciences in La Jolla, California. Latour and Woolgar’s account broke away from the positivist view of scientific inquiry as a rational and largely asocial process capable of uncovering universally valid truths regarding the natural world. They instead presented scientific knowledge as an artificial product of various social, political, and economic interactions, most of them competitive.

Latour further expanded on these ideas in such books as Les Microbes: guerre et paix, suivi de irréductions (1984; published in English as The Pasteurization of France), Science in Action (1987), and Nous n’avons jamais été modernes (1991; We Have Never Been Modern). In his writings, Latour often likened the scientific community to a battlefield: new theories, facts, techniques, and technologies succeeded by marshalling enough users and supporters to overwhelm any alternatives, thus immunizing themselves against future challenges. It was by winning this fight for dominance that scientific facts came to be true; Latour dismissed questions about the universal validity of scientific facts as both unanswerable and irrelevant to his concerns. This insistence on seeing scientific facts as purely social constructions sometimes led Latour to conclusions that were seen as absurd outside the community of social theorists. In 1998, for example, Latour rejected as anachronistic the recent discovery that the pharaoh Ramses II had died of tuberculosis, asserting that the tubercle bacillus was discovered only in 1882 and could not properly be said to have existed before then.

Another distinguishing aspect of Latour’s work was its focus on the complex and heterogeneous relationships between both human and nonhuman agents. He argued that the production of scientific knowledge could be understood only by tracing networks of relationships between entities as disparate as lab animals, existing scientific texts, human researchers, experimental subjects, established technologies, and social movements, among others. This approach became known as actor-network theory, and its influence soon spread beyond Latour’s field of science and technology studies. Latour’s work exasperated many practicing scientists with its denial of the existence of objective truths and its claims to have unmasked science as a social process and debunked its pretenses of rationality. However, his work was welcomed by many social scientists for its fresh and innovative approach to the study of science.

While conducting his research, Latour also taught. Between 1982 and 2006, Latour taught at MINES ParisTech (École Nationale Supérieure des Mines de Paris). In 2007 he became a professor at the Institute of Political Sciences (Institut des Sciences Politiques; “Sciences Po”) in Paris and served as vice president for research.

Among Latour’s many books are Aramis ou l’amour des techinques (1992; Aramis; or, the Love of Technology), which traces a failed attempt to construct an automated personal rapid transit system in Paris; Politiques de la nature (1999; The Politics of Nature), an examination of the connections between nature, science, and politics; and Sur le culte moderne des dieux faitiches (2009; On the Modern Cult of the Factish Gods), which draws connections between religious and scientific belief systems.

0 comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *