Ozone Layer Depletion Essay

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Essay about Ozone Layer Depletion

1623 Words7 Pages

Ozone Layer Depletion

Ozone is a natural trace component of the atmosphere. It is created continuously through

the action of sunlight and oxygen in the upper atmosphere. At the same time this destroyed by

various reactions with other components in the air. The next result of these natural processes is the

so-called ozone layer in the stratosphere at altitudes between 15 and 50 kilometers in which the

concentration of the ozone is raised. Ozone is a colorless gas, a form of oxygen. However, an

ordinary molecule of oxygen contains two atoms. Because of ozone's composition, it is reactive. It

readily combines with whatever materials it comes in contact with, including such biological

substances as cells and…show more content…

At first, the gas was little protection

from the sun's UV radiation. But according to some evolutionary theories, life forms on earth may

have been able to develop in water that filtered out most of the UV rays but allowed enough visible

lights for chemical reactions to take place.

However, ozone concentration are not static, winds transport, ozone throughout the

stratosphere. Although the photochemical process constantly produces ozone, it is also destroyed by

chemical reactions involving such gases as nitrogen, hydrogen, and chlorine. In addition, the

amounts of ozone change with seasons. The end results, is that over centuries

ozone in the stratosphere has maintained a dynamic equilibrium: the production and loss processes

have balanced. Keeping a layer of ozone around the planet that protects all life from too much UV

radiation. However, that delicate balance now may be threatened. Why did scientist become

concerned about the ozone layer? A number of events prompted scientific

research into the possibility that the ozone layer might be in danger. The research on the

stratospheric effects of shuttle launches altered others in the scientific community and in

government agencies to view chlorine compounds as possible threats to the ozone layer. Damage to

the ozone layer is largely caused by the release of certain volatile chemicals in the halogenated

hydrocarbons

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The Effects of Ozone Depletion Essay

1265 Words6 Pages

The ozone layer is a deep layer in the Earth’s stratosphere that has an altitude of about 6.2 miles and contains a high concentration of ozone molecules. The ozone layer shields the entire Earth from some of the harmful ultraviolet rays that come from the sun. The Earth’s atmosphere is composed of several layers, but the layer that we live in - the “troposphere” – is where most weather occurs. Above the troposphere is the stratosphere which is where most of the effects caused by ozone holes and global warming originate. The ozone layer absorbs 97% to about 99% of the Sun’s medium-frequency ultraviolet light which could otherwise potentially harm and damage exposed life forms on the surface of the Earth. There are three main types of…show more content…

The ozone layer is a deep layer in the Earth’s stratosphere that has an altitude of about 6.2 miles and contains a high concentration of ozone molecules. The ozone layer shields the entire Earth from some of the harmful ultraviolet rays that come from the sun. The Earth’s atmosphere is composed of several layers, but the layer that we live in - the “troposphere” – is where most weather occurs. Above the troposphere is the stratosphere which is where most of the effects caused by ozone holes and global warming originate. The ozone layer absorbs 97% to about 99% of the Sun’s medium-frequency ultraviolet light which could otherwise potentially harm and damage exposed life forms on the surface of the Earth. There are three main types of ultraviolet light which are produced from the Sun: UV-A radiation, UV-B radiation and UV-C radiation. UV-A has a long wavelength of about 315 to 400 nanometers from the sun and is considered a “black light” which is not strongly absorbed by the Earth’s ozone. UV-B has a medium wave length of about 315 to 280 nanometers which is mostly absorbed by the ozone layer. Human exposure to UV-B rays increases the risk of skin cancer, a weakened immune system, and cataracts. Additionally, UV-B exposure can also damage single cell organisms, terrestrial plant life, and aquatic ecosystems. UV-C has a short wave length of 280 to 100 nanometers and is completely absorbed by the ozone layer and the atmosphere. UV-C has a variety of positive uses, but

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